• Anna Solana, science journalist

    Why do I have open pores?

    20 Oct Why do I have open pores?

     

    Sources:

    Cosmetics & Toiletries

    Everyone has open pores, but they are more noticeable in some skins than in others. The blame may lie with genetics, as is often the case, but only partly. Temperature and relative humidity, exposure to the sun, skin type, hormonal changes and age also enlarge the pores and make the skin look rough. The question is, however, what’s the solution?

     

    We have about two million pores, which are absolutely necessary for the proper functioning of the skin, as they eliminate toxins, regulate temperature and hydrate the skin. But it's hard to appreciate all this when you can’t help but see them – because they are dilated or dirty from an accumulation of dead cells and other impurities, making your skin look unhealthy and aged. And this is not necessarily for lack of care. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Sunscreens are not enough to avoid cancer

    15 Oct Sunscreens are not enough to avoid cancer

     

    Sources:

    Nature

    A few years ago the European Union banned use of the term total block" in sunscreen labels because it led to confusion. There is, in fact, no photoprotection that is 100% effective against UV radiation. A study published recently in Nature confirms that sunscreens do not protect fully against melanoma but this does not mean we should stop using them.

     

    The research – conducted by scientists from the Institute of Cancer Research in London and Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute – demonstrates that even a sun protection factor (SPF) of 50 allows some DNA-damaging radiation to penetrate the skin, possibly causing melanoma. This, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, affects every year about 160,000 people worldwide, according to WHO, with the number of cases in Spain increasing by 38% in the last four years. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    The skin and the impact of pollution

    It’s something like the layer of dust and dirt that accumulates on cars between washes. Even despite make-up and daily care, pollution particles stick to our skin, dehydrate it, make it less firm and radiant and even cause blemishes. Air pollution is as harmful as smoking for the complexion. But depending on where we live it may be impossible to avoid it. What can we do to protect our skin?

     

    According to a report published by the European Environment Agency (EEA) in 2013, the air we breathe in Europe is far from clean. In fact, the EEA says that over 90% of the inhabitants of European cities are exposed to worrying levels of PM2.5 (particles smaller than 2.5 microns) – largely originating in diesel-vehicle emissions – and excessively high ozone levels. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    How the sun sees you…

    4 Oct

     

     

    Ultraviolet vision cameras penetrate under our skin better than our normal vision, which only sees the epidermis’ surface. The same applies to the sun's UV rays, which penetrate the skin and, year by year, damage the deeper layers without us being aware of it. This video shows how exposure to the sun alters our skin’s protective layer.

     

    Thomas Leveritt is an Anglo-American artist who decided this summer to help dermatologists raise awareness of the importance of using sunscreen. That’s why he made this video on the streets of Brooklyn (New York).  Using an ultraviolet vision camera, he filmed anyone willing to pose and then showed them images of sun damage on their skin not visible to the naked eye. Read More

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