• Fede Montagud, editor

    Emojis also reflect phototypes

    27 Apr Emojis also reflect phototypes

     

    Sources:

    NPR News

    Emojis are the faces that are used to express emotions in online communications. Anyone who uses a mobile phone, instant messaging or social networks will have seen lots of them. In the latest version of its operating system, Apple has introduced new emojis with different skin tones, resulting is some controversy in the WWW.

     

    Some forums refer to racism, because, it is claimed, the yellow faces are too yellow. Online, the least little outburst can set the WWW afire. The question is why has Apple classified humans in terms of six skin tones: why not four or 10? Is this a whim of Apple designers? No, in fact. Apple designers have done their homework and the decision is scientifically grounded. The new Apple emojis, which users worldwide are already downloading, are based on the phototype classification created in 1975 by Thomas B. Fitzpatrick and widely used today. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Ageing … in five minutes

    27 Mar

     

    This video entitled “Danielle”, by audiovisual creator Anthony Cerniello, has been played more than 6.4 million times. It shows, in less than five minutes, the changes that time imprints on the skin over a lifetime. It is a simple piece of multimedia art that reminds us that the skin is the most visible part of our body and that life moves on inexorably for all of us.

     

    The idea, says the author, was "to show a process which is not seen but is felt” … that just unfolds as we smile, cry, live. Cerniello teamed up with a photographer and several animators to take photos of Danielle’s family, edit them and assemble them Timelapse style to show the effects of time on the face. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Sunburns triple the risk of skin cancer

    21 Nov

     

    Sunburn is dangerous. It may increase the risk of skin cancer, even though we may have been burned – as children – before we were aware of the consequences. We have been warned time and again, but we still see skins red as tomatoes from the sun.

     

    That’s why some organizations continue to emphasize informing the consumer. This Cancer Research (UK) video explains what happens to cells when the sun damages them and the difference with other burns caused by hot objects. The other burns heal, but burns from the sun can have dramatic consequences many years later. Contact burns merely destroy some skin cells, nothing more. Sunburn also destroys cells, but it also alters the DNA of surviving cells and this can lead to the development of cancer. A simple but enlightening reason not to forget to protect yourself from the sun. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    How the sun sees you…

    4 Oct

     

     

    Ultraviolet vision cameras penetrate under our skin better than our normal vision, which only sees the epidermis’ surface. The same applies to the sun's UV rays, which penetrate the skin and, year by year, damage the deeper layers without us being aware of it. This video shows how exposure to the sun alters our skin’s protective layer.

     

    Thomas Leveritt is an Anglo-American artist who decided this summer to help dermatologists raise awareness of the importance of using sunscreen. That’s why he made this video on the streets of Brooklyn (New York).  Using an ultraviolet vision camera, he filmed anyone willing to pose and then showed them images of sun damage on their skin not visible to the naked eye. Read More

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