• Fede Montagud, editor

    Vitamin D: ten minutes of sunlight is enough

    5 Dec Vitamin D: ten minutes of sunlight is enough

     

    Sources:

    NHS Choices

    Skin care always generates topics for debate. The vitamin D debate is open and can be summarized as follows: we need sunlight to synthesize essential vitamin D, but we all know that overexposure is a bad thing. What’s best for our health?

     

    Vitamin D is necessary for survival, as without it our body cannot absorb calcium and phosphorus from food. And without these elements bones develop osteoporosis and become brittle. Moreover, a lack of vitamin D is related to certain types of cancer, diabetes and a number of heart disorders. Only 10% of the vitamin D we use comes from our diet (oily fish, eggs, liver, meat, cheese); most is synthesized in our skin thanks to the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Doctors are aware that more than half of Europeans have vitamin D deficiency. And the further north we go, the more cases, because sunshine is rarer at higher latitudes. Read more

  • Rosa Taberner, dermatologist

    When sweating is a problem

    22 Nov When sweating is a problem

     

    Sources:

    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas

    AEDV

    Sweating is necessary. Sweating through the skin is the physiological response to an increase in body temperature during physical exercise or because of excessive heat. Sweat evaporation cooling the body is the mechanism by which temperature is regulated. If this mechanism fails even death may result. But some people sweat excessively and, for them, hyperhidrosis is a very annoying problem.

     

    The skin has three types of sweat glands. The most numerous are the eccrine glands, responsible for thermoregulation by sweating. They are distributed over all the skin, but are particularly to be found in palms, soles, armpits and the face; the apocrine glands, primarily located in the armpits, nipples and perineal area, are responsible for body odour. Humans have between two and four million eccrine sweat glands distributed all over the body surface and averaging about 600 per square centimetre. A person can sweat several litres per hour and up to ten litres in a day. Read more

  • Josep Orellana, science journalist

    Contact dermatitis: substances to avoid

    11 Nov Contact dermatitis: substances to avoid

     

    Sources:

    ACAAI

    Clinical Key

    Contact dermatitis is one of the ten main reasons for primary care consultations. More than 3,000 substances may cause contact dermatitis on different people’s skins. Certain cosmetics, hair dyes and shampoos contain potentially irritating components. Identifying the causative agent is crucial.

     

    Contact dermatitis is an inflammatory reaction of the skin due to exposure to certain substances. Irritant contact dermatitis is when a product first produces a local toxic effect in the skin cells, whereas allergic contact dermatitis is when a substance causes an allergic reaction due to skin sensitization from repeated contact. Read more

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Vitamins for the skin

    Admittedly, all vitamins have an important role to play. Many are sold as essential supplements without which it would seem impossible to have a perfect complexion. But few studies support their effectiveness. What vitamins does the skin truly need? How effective are vitamin-based creams and food supplements?

     

    It seems that without them our skin would look horrible. Vitamin A for dry skin problems such as acne or psoriasis. Vitamin B3 to prevent sun allergies. Vitamin B6 to balance oily skin. Vitamin C to repair sun damage, delay skin ageing and help collagen production. Vitamin D, produced by sunlight, to better absorb calcium and phosphorus, strengthen bones and prevent cavities. Vitamin E to fight free radicals and stimulate microcirculation. Finally, vitamin K (lately fashionable in cosmetic products), to prevent varicose veins and spider veins and reduce bags under the eyes. Read more

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