• Anna Solana, science journalist

    Skincare through psychodermatology

    30 Apr Skincare through psychodermatology




    We all know that some skin conditions have a psychological dimension. And we aren’t referring to going red when we feel ashamed or breaking out in a sweat from fear. Acne, psoriasis and even certain kinds of warts may be psychological in origin and, according to psychodermatologists, can be treated with hypnosis, relaxation, meditation or psychotherapy.


    Some 10 years ago, a Harvard Medical School article launched a debate about the effectiveness of what is called psychodermatology. Can psychological therapy cure a skin problem? North American and European psychodermatologists think so, and, for many years, have defended the validity of their theories and therapies based on linking the psyche with the skin. Just to make it clear, we are referring to dermatologists and psychiatrists who use relaxation, meditation and hypnosis, that is, people with medical degrees. A doctor’s diagnosis is essential before any therapy. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Ageing … in five minutes

    27 Mar


    This video entitled “Danielle”, by audiovisual creator Anthony Cerniello, has been played more than 6.4 million times. It shows, in less than five minutes, the changes that time imprints on the skin over a lifetime. It is a simple piece of multimedia art that reminds us that the skin is the most visible part of our body and that life moves on inexorably for all of us.


    The idea, says the author, was "to show a process which is not seen but is felt” … that just unfolds as we smile, cry, live. Cerniello teamed up with a photographer and several animators to take photos of Danielle’s family, edit them and assemble them Timelapse style to show the effects of time on the face. Read More

  • Ailish Maher, science journalist

    The lowdown on clay

    6 Mar The lowdown on clay



    Applied Clay Science

    Clay, with its rich content in minerals, is making a comeback as a powerful healer and skin beauty treatment. Benefits are backed more by a history of successful use that stretches back to ancient times than by scientific studies. However, one claim that is solidly backed by science is that some clays have powerful antibacterial properties.


    Clay has been deployed for medicinal and aesthetic purposes for centuries. It was used in Mesopotamia and Egypt for its antiinflammatory and antiseptic properties and was also reportedly used by Cleopatra to preserve her complexion. Famous physicians such as Hippocrates, Avicenna, Averroes and Paracelsus — and also Sebastian Kneipp, one of the founders of the naturopathic medicine movement — all recommended clay remedies for the skin. Clay was also used to promote the healing of surgical and war wounds. Read More

  • Susana Andújar, chemist

    Daily care of oily skin

    11 Feb Daily care of oily skin

    Our choice of cosmetics should be based on knowledge of our skin and its needs. Products exist that are specifically formulated for the care and protection of each skin type and each life stage. The daily care information and tips below are aimed at people who have very oily skin.


    We usually develop oily skin in adolescence due to age-related hormonal changes (with androgens playing a very important role), which lead to increased sebum secretion and, frequently, acne. Over time the excess oil production will slow down and the skin's appearance will improve. Sometimes the problem arises from the use of very comedogenic (favouring acne) cosmetics or products that are not suitable for oily skin. The prevalence of acne in adolescence is very high; some 70%-80% of teenagers affected, with little difference between boys and girls. Read More