• Josep Orellana, science journalist

    Diabetes and skincare

    10 Dec Diabetes and skincare



    American Diabetes Association

    Diabetes affects some 380 million people worldwide, a number that is steadily increasing. In the near future one in 10 adults will be affected by diabetes. This disease has multiple adverse effects for our health, many of them related to the skin. How can we reduce the risks and protect our skin?


    People with longstanding diabetes (high blood sugar) are more prone to skin problems. One in three people with diabetes is affected by skin disorders, which are often the first warning of the presence of the disease. High blood glucose levels cause biochemical changes in the skin that alter its structure and functions. These changes induce dryness, loss of elasticity and premature skin ageing. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Bacteria as a spray for skin hygiene

    30 Oct Bacteria as a spray for skin hygiene



    Science Daily

    Caring for the skin without washing improves its appearance. Or so claims an AOBiome study, presented in early October in Washington, that points to the beneficial effects of spraying the skin with Nitrosomonas eutropha, a bacterium that metabolizes ammonia in sweat to eliminate body odour.


    A company called AOBiome has launched a bacterial spray in the market that theoretically could save water and improve the appearance of the skin. The invention, called AO+ Refreshing Cosmetic Mist, is not exactly cheap: 99 euros for a month’s supply and 249 euros for three months’ supply. But apparently it’s worth it. In fact, its creator, David Whitlock, who says he hasn’t showered in 12 years (!!), argues fervently that Nitrosomonas may be a solution for acne and for chronic skin wounds. Read More

  • Núria Estapé, science journalist

    Microbiota – the skin’s “flora”

    31 Aug Microbiota - the skin’s "flora"



    The New York Times

    Our skin is a balanced ecosystem. Since it was colonized by billions of bacteria, viruses, fungi and mites at the dawn of the evolution of hominids, many species of microorganisms have lived in symbiosis with our skin mantle cells. Science’s efforts to identify our colonizers have revealed how essential these microorganisms are for the health of our skin. The most natural way to healthy skin is to help maintain the balance between all these microorganisms.


    Although it may be difficult to credit, only 10% of the cells of the body’s skin, intestines and mucous membranes are human. Most of them are of microscopic organisms that belong to the microbiota, the set of all foreign microbes that live in our body, especially in the digestive organs and the skin. For example, each square centimetre of human skin contains approximately one million microorganisms from a hundred different species. Together these form the skin’s microbiota (traditionally called the skin’s "flora”). This ecosystem is comparable in complexity to any other system in the Earth’s mantle. Today we know that our skin has hosted these microorganisms over thousands of years of evolution and that it is the symbiosis between our own cells and these tiny guests which helps the skin to perform its primary function of acting as a protective physical barrier. Read More

  • Violeta Camarasa, science journalist

    15 golden rules to control acne

    Acne is a skin imbalance that affects many young people. Although unsightly, acne is not usually serious and can be brought under control with a basic skin care routine. The challenge is to avoid bad habits: to keep acne at bay, first you have to keep yourself in check! Here are 15 tips for daily prevention and treatment of mild acne problems.


    Adolescence is a period of change. Because the body is developing physically and psychologically, the transition can cause certain hormonal imbalances that affect the skin, such as the overproduction of sebum (oil). Although usually not serious, acne is visible and often results in lowered self-esteem. According to some studies, 30% of young people with acne stop going out, which seriously affects their personal development. Do not let acne change your life: look after yourself and visit the dermatologist, a doctor who specializes in the skin and its health. Our tips will help you control this problem that is so typical in young people. Read More