• Anna Solana, science journalist

    When smelling bad is not a matter of hygiene

    28 Aug When smelling bad is not a matter of hygiene



    EFE Salud

    An offensive body odour may not be the result of a lack of hygiene. Bromhidrosis is a disorder affecting both men and women and usually associated with secretions by the apocrine sweat glands located in the armpits, pubis, perineum and navel, behind the ears and in the folds under the breast. It is a chronic but treatable disorder.


    Persons affected by bromhidrosis do not perspire more; rather, their apocrine glands produce sweat containing ceramides that are different to those of the rest of the population. When broken down by the skin’s bacteria, a strong odour is the result. This odour, which is often described as pungent, musty or sour, cannot be dissumulated. The condition is believed to be genetic in origin, but may also be caused by a metabolic disorder such as diabetes, by thyroid or adrenal gland alterations or by certain drugs. In addition, certain foods, such as onions, garlic and spices, and also tobacco use and alcohol consumption, can aggravate the condition. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    The wrinkle filler crisis

    24 Mar The wrinkle filler crisis



    BBC News Health

    Rejuvenating skin treatments in the form of injections of various kinds have averted the need for cosmetic surgery for many women (and men). But side effects have proliferated, because the products are not always of high quality and the people who administer them do not necessarily have suitable qualifications.


    Would you get a botox or collagen injection at a hairdressing salon or a beauty party? Well, it happens a lot and, in view of the complications, has raised the alarm among doctors. The UK Royal College of Surgeons, for instance, has launched an initiative to ensure that only doctors, qualified nurses and dentists can inject botox, which is actually a powerful neurotoxin. In addition, charlatans offer misleadingly cheap offers and inject diluted hyaluronic acid – and logically the effect lasts half as long. In the USA, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has only approved five substances, along with botox, as wrinkle fillers, and all are considered medicines. In Europe, however, almost 50 substances are allowed. If you are thinking about removing years from your face using collagen, hyaluronic acid or botox injections, consult a specialist medical centre. Do not put your skin or body at risk.

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Winning the war against wrinkles

    10 Mar Winning the war against wrinkles



    University of Maryland

    "Wrinkles are beautiful," said Adolfo Dominguez, who coined this slogan, famous in the Spanish fashion trade of the 1980s. This is not true, however. According to different sources, the market for dealing with the wrinkles that etch the years onto our skin will be worth 290,000 million dollars by 2015. Youth is purchased at exorbitant prices. And techniques are increasingly sophisticated. But what are these techniques? And more importantly, do they work?


    The options are many. And new seemingly impossible combinations are offered, with succulent promises. Basically, however, the techniques can be reduced to either applying something to the skin or removing something from the skin. Applying products to the skin make it appear fresher, whereas removing layers and stretching the skin renews it. This may seem a gross simplification, but it helps understand the panoply of treatments that promise to take years off you. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Menopause: maturity is skin deep

    11 Feb Menopause: maturity is skin deep




    The menopause receives bad press. Many women associate it with a loss of attractiveness, because it marks the end of a life stage and is the source of discomfort and changes. Less well known, perhaps, are how it causes changes in the skin that do not affect all women equally, but largely depend on skin type and lifestyle. But – is there a solution?


    Menopause marks the end of the reproductive stage and involves significant changes for women. But there are ways to cope. According to the Spanish Association for Menopause Studies (AEEM), menopause occurs at 51.4 years on average, once the body stops producing oestrogen and progesterone; it ends ovarian functioning and, therefore, the menstrual period. Hormonal changes are to blame for hot flushes, insomnia, mood swings and vaginal atrophy, and also ageing of the skin, in other words, dryness, wrinkles and sagging. Read More