• Anna Solana, science journalist

    Diamonds for the skin

    16 Jun Diamonds for the skin



    Cosmetics Design

    For several years diamond-dust creams have been sold as an outrageously expensive treatment used by celebrities to ensure they walk the red carpet with a fabulous complexion. Now, Asian scientists say they have managed to produce diamonds inexpensively in their laboratory — making this luxury skin care fad potentially more affordable.


    The labels of creams containing diamond dust promise a smoother, younger skin from the first application, claiming that this gem has exfoliating properties that stimulate collagen production and help conceal wrinkles and blemishes. Marketing makes these texts not very different from those for other creams based on less exclusive ingredients. What is different, however, is the price of these exclusive creams, clearly aimed at the pockets of those who can afford the luxury. Read More

  • Núria Estapé, science journalist

    A cosmetic’s journey into the skin

    Manufacturers promise flawless skin if we use cosmetics that they claim penetrate the skin and improve cell functioning. And yes, of course they do penetrate – but to what depth? The skin’s outermost layer, specially designed to act as a barrier, is formed of nearly impermeable tissue. So, how can cosmetics penetrate the skin?


    No cosmetic active ingredient has yet been invented that crosses the epidermal barrier and penetrates deep into the skin. In fact, a substance that appears to penetrate the dermis and hypodermis is most likely absorbed by the blood vessels. In that case it would be a drug, not a cosmetic active ingredient, because it affects metabolism. With nicotine patches applied to the skin, for instance, tiny nicotine molecules travel via the skin layers until they reach blood vessels. Does nicotine act on the skin on its way to the blood? The answer is no. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Glycans: is this the sugar the skin needs?

    28 Feb Glycans: is this the sugar the skin needs?



    American Academy of Dermatology

    These complex carbohydrates are not related to the sugars we ingest through food. Glycans, found on the cell surface, play an important role in intercellular communication, metabolism and skin structuring. Maybe that's why they have become the new promise of youth in the world of cosmetics.


    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) noted the importance of glycans in an article titled “Glycomics”, published in 2001, but for over a decade scientific advances in this field were timid. However, for some years now, the cosmetics industry has been flirting with the benefits of this line of research for improving the appearance of the skin. In fact, some brands already have creams in the market whose labels include the term "glycans", conjugated with the term "eternal youth". Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Microneedling: needles that rejuvenate the skin

    16 Jan Microneedling: needles that rejuvenate the skin



    DermNet NZ


    Microneedling, which can be performed on all skin types, is starting to overtake laser, as there is no burn risk. Also called skin needling or collagen induction therapy, it is a minimally invasive treatment that improves the appearance of the skin and can even treat problems like acne, cellulite and stretch marks. The technique, based on thousands of pinpricks that activate skin regeneration, is the latest in rejuvenation.


    Microneedling consists of passing a roller with very short, fine needles over the skin. The resulting tiny wounds open microchannels that cause the body to naturally produce more reparative collagen and elastin. The procedure improves the texture and firmness of the skin and so attenuates scars, stretch marks and even the size of pores. These tiny wounds can facilitate the absorption of other substances that fight the signs of ageing, such as vitamin C, retinol and hyaluronic acid. Read More