• Anna Solana, science journalist

    Confirmed: sunscreen prevents wrinkles

    20 Dec Confirmed: sunscreen prevents wrinkles



    Annals of Internal Medicine

    Just over a year ago we published scientific evidence on the effectiveness of sunscreens against wrinkles. Since then the cosmetics sector has included sunscreen in many products, like make-up, with good results. The message is clear: sunscreen is crucial. Always.


    In June 2013, the Annals of Internal Medicine published the results of a major study, conducted in Australia over four years, which underlined that wearing sunscreen daily helps prevent wrinkles. In fact, the study, a milestone for professionals in terms of duration and scope, underlined that a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 is more effective than taking nutritional supplements, such as beta-carotene, to preserve the skin. Read More

  • Núria Estapé, science journalist

    The skin and environmental stress

    Air pollution, extreme temperatures, artificial light, ultraviolet radiation, noise, cigarette smoke and traffic fumes: all these environmental stressors threaten the health of our skin. Recent studies show that when the skin is continuously exposed to various forms of environmental stress it ages much faster and becomes vulnerable to diseases such as cancer.


    The skin is the wrapper that connects us to the environment and protects our body from the inclemencies of the weather. This is hardly surprising, as the skin is the body’s organ that suffers most when our living environment is toxic and inhospitable. Our skin reflects everything, whether it comes from within or without, whether it’s psychological problems, the repercussions of what we eat, the air we breathe or what touches our skin. Living conditions in large cities and industrial areas have created new problems for our skin, designed to be able to adapt to temperature and humidity variations in natural habitats. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Mosquito bites – a nightmare!

    10 Dec Mosquito bites – a nightmare!




    Day or night, mosquitoes are very annoying when they attack our skin. In some parts of the world they also transmit serious diseases. Popular lore and scientists describe several ways to avoid their bites. But mosquitoes are hugely adaptive...


    Apart from a pepper derivative called icaridin, N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide, known as DEET, is one of the most studied and widely used insect and arachnid repellents. However, according to a recent study published in the Plos One journal, DEET is losing its effectiveness against mosquitoes and the reason is that exposure to this chemical changes their olfactory system. In other words, the mosquitoes get used to the smell and carry on as regardless. So what alternatives are there? Read More

  • Josep Orellana, science journalist

    Protecting the skin from infrared radiation

    We are well aware of the adverse effects of the sun’s radiation on our skin and blame ultraviolet light (UVA and UVB). To reduce its impact we use sunscreens and limit sunbathing. But the sun's infrared rays can also penetrate to the deeper layers of the skin.


    Sunlight is composed of ultraviolet light (7%) and visible light (38%), but infrared (IR) light, at 54%, represents the most important fraction. Depending on the wavelength, IR radiation is classified into three types: IRA, IRB and IRC. Both UV and visible light are attenuated by melanin, a substance secreted in the top layers of skin. However, IRA rays can pass through to the deeper layers of the skin. Read More