• Ailish Maher, science journalist

    Laser treatments for ageing or damaged skin

    21 Jan Laser treatments for ageing or damaged skin



    Mayo Clinic

    Mail Online

    You have probably heard of the wonders of laser skin treatments and so may be asking if laser could help overcome some of the effects of ageing that start to become increasingly visible as you grow older. Be guided by a reputable dermatologist who will advise you regarding the treatment best suited for your skin type and condition — and also for your pocket.


    Laser advances are most especially being made at the cosmetic end of the spectrum, which means they are less invasive than traditional treatments like chemicals peels and dermabrasion. However, if you are considering some kind of laser or light-based treatment for your skin, it is extremely important that you consult a dermatologist or specialist centre. Be sure to ask about side effects, recovery times, number and frequency of treatments, any pre- and post-treatment skincare requirements. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Why do I have open pores?

    20 Oct Why do I have open pores?



    Cosmetics & Toiletries

    Everyone has open pores, but they are more noticeable in some skins than in others. The blame may lie with genetics, as is often the case, but only partly. Temperature and relative humidity, exposure to the sun, skin type, hormonal changes and age also enlarge the pores and make the skin look rough. The question is, however, what’s the solution?


    We have about two million pores, which are absolutely necessary for the proper functioning of the skin, as they eliminate toxins, regulate temperature and hydrate the skin. But it's hard to appreciate all this when you can’t help but see them – because they are dilated or dirty from an accumulation of dead cells and other impurities, making your skin look unhealthy and aged. And this is not necessarily for lack of care. Read More

  • Rosa Taberner, dermatologist

    Acne heals, but the scars remain

    20 Sep Acne heals, but the scars remain



    The Lancet

    Acne, particularly common in teenagers, is one of the world’s most common skin disorders. Although it results in a wide range of lesions, acne, even if untreated, is often benign. However, sequelae in the form of scars may persist for life.


    Acne is such a common problem that we often take it for granted as a normal physiological phenomenon. Some 85% of adolescents experience, to a greater or lesser degree, acne lesions of various types: comedones (blackheads and whiteheads), papules (pinheads), pustules (infected pimples) and nodules (larger, raised and often painful lesions). Fortunately, very effective treatments are available nowadays and most cases resolve in time. But if the lesions become scars, these can persist for life. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    When smelling bad is not a matter of hygiene

    28 Aug When smelling bad is not a matter of hygiene



    EFE Salud

    An offensive body odour may not be the result of a lack of hygiene. Bromhidrosis is a disorder affecting both men and women and usually associated with secretions by the apocrine sweat glands located in the armpits, pubis, perineum and navel, behind the ears and in the folds under the breast. It is a chronic but treatable disorder.


    Persons affected by bromhidrosis do not perspire more; rather, their apocrine glands produce sweat containing ceramides that are different to those of the rest of the population. When broken down by the skin’s bacteria, a strong odour is the result. This odour, which is often described as pungent, musty or sour, cannot be dissumulated. The condition is believed to be genetic in origin, but may also be caused by a metabolic disorder such as diabetes, by thyroid or adrenal gland alterations or by certain drugs. In addition, certain foods, such as onions, garlic and spices, and also tobacco use and alcohol consumption, can aggravate the condition. Read More