• Anna Solana, science journalist

    BB, CC, DD, EE creams…

    20 Dec BB, CC, DD, EE creams...



    The Guardian

    The Huffington Post

    These pairs of letters are not codenames for operating systems, usually identified with letters of the alphabet. They rather describe multifunction or all-in-one creams that, for years, have promised countless benefits for the skin. But what are the differences between the BB, CC, DD and EE versions? Do they actually work or are they merely effective marketing strategies?


    BB creams have been on the Western market for some five years, although the name has existed for far longer. In fact, the German dermatologist and allergist Christine Schrammek claims to have developed the first Blemish Balm (BB) cream in 1967 to treat the skin after peeling treatments. The original formula contained zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, licorice root and panthenol — an anti-inflammatory, protective, soothing and moisturizing cocktail that gave the product considerable appeal. Read More

  • Núria Estapé, science journalist

    The skin’s natural moisturizing factor

    31 Mar The skin’s natural moisturizing factor



    Practical Dermatology

    Our skin is equipped with the perfect machinery whose function is to retain water and prevent dehydration. The skin, a vital organ in our body, has the crucial function of protecting all the other organs within it. And it does so through a complex network of molecules called the natural moisturizing factor (NMF), which ensures a delicately balanced epidermis, despite environmental variations in humidity and temperature.


    When we are born our skin is already equipped to stay hydrated and protected from UV rays. Time and environmental aggressions wear down the skin’s mantle, with the result that we lose the water-retaining capacity in some of the beneficial substances in the skin, which should contain some 10% to 15% water. If the water level falls to under 10%, dry skin problems develop: the skin becomes brittle, rough and dull and is more prone to eczema and infections. How can we ensure that the skin retains a minimum of water? Read More

  • Susana Andújar, chemist

    Daily care of dry skin

    24 Dec Daily care of dry skin

    Understanding our skin and its needs should be the basis for our choice of cosmetics, so if you have very dry skin, you need to use products that are specifically formulated to treat dry skin and that also take into account your life stage. Below we provided some basic guidance for people with very dry skin.


    Dry skin has various causes, among them, genetics, aggressive drugs, overexposure to cold or sun, natural ageing, etc. But dryness is always the result of two factors: lack or excess loss of water (dehydration) and deficient sebum secretion by the sebaceous glands. A healthy, elastic, comfortable-feeling skin requires an optimal level of water in the stratum corneum. Certain components in dry skin are altered, but can be restored by suitable cosmetics. Hydration is the best way to maintain youthful skin and delay the onset of signs of ageing. Read More

  • Ailish Maher, science journalist

    Flying: it wreaks havoc on the skin

    16 Nov Flying: it wreaks havoc on the skin



    Everyday Health

    El País

    When you fly, pressurized air in the cabin sucks out the moisture in your skin, leaving it feeling dry and looking dull and lacklustre. The haggard complexion on landing is directly proportional to the length of the flight. What can we do to protect our skin so that we don’t look drained when we land?


    Cabins are pressurized using low-humidity conditioned air to create a safe and comfortable environment for passengers and crew flying at high altitudes and protect them from the risk of physiological problems caused by low outside air pressure. But flying does affect the skin. The main repercussions for the skin on the face and the body arise from dehydration: dry skin, cracked lips and dry throat, nose, eyes and hands. The body also responds to jet lag and fatigue by releasing the stress hormone cortisol, which impairs the skin's barrier function and causes redness, blotchiness and breakouts. Read More