• Susana Andújar, chemist

    Daily care of dry skin

    24 Dec Daily care of dry skin

    Understanding our skin and its needs should be the basis for our choice of cosmetics, so if you have very dry skin, you need to use products that are specifically formulated to treat dry skin and that also take into account your life stage. Below we provided some basic guidance for people with very dry skin.


    Dry skin has various causes, among them, genetics, aggressive drugs, overexposure to cold or sun, natural ageing, etc. But dryness is always the result of two factors: lack or excess loss of water (dehydration) and deficient sebum secretion by the sebaceous glands. A healthy, elastic, comfortable-feeling skin requires an optimal level of water in the stratum corneum. Certain components in dry skin are altered, but can be restored by suitable cosmetics. Hydration is the best way to maintain youthful skin and delay the onset of signs of ageing. Read More

  • Núria Estapé, science journalist

    Microbiota – the skin’s “flora”

    31 Aug Microbiota - the skin’s "flora"



    The New York Times

    Our skin is a balanced ecosystem. Since it was colonized by billions of bacteria, viruses, fungi and mites at the dawn of the evolution of hominids, many species of microorganisms have lived in symbiosis with our skin mantle cells. Science’s efforts to identify our colonizers have revealed how essential these microorganisms are for the health of our skin. The most natural way to healthy skin is to help maintain the balance between all these microorganisms.


    Although it may be difficult to credit, only 10% of the cells of the body’s skin, intestines and mucous membranes are human. Most of them are of microscopic organisms that belong to the microbiota, the set of all foreign microbes that live in our body, especially in the digestive organs and the skin. For example, each square centimetre of human skin contains approximately one million microorganisms from a hundred different species. Together these form the skin’s microbiota (traditionally called the skin’s "flora”). This ecosystem is comparable in complexity to any other system in the Earth’s mantle. Today we know that our skin has hosted these microorganisms over thousands of years of evolution and that it is the symbiosis between our own cells and these tiny guests which helps the skin to perform its primary function of acting as a protective physical barrier. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Turmeric: 21st century aloe vera?

    20 May Turmeric: 21st century aloe vera?




    Turmeric, which has anti-inflammatory, moisturizing, anti-oxidant, anti-microbial and healing properties, could be an important ingredient in the creams of the future, according to several studies by different universities. Extract of turmeric, used in curry, protects the skin from UV damage and helps regenerate it.


    Part of the Ayurvedic pharmacopoeia and used in various Asian public health systems, turmeric is prescribed to treat stomach and joint ailments. It is also used as a coadjuvant treatment in wound healing and in revitalizing the skin. More recently, scientists at Ehime University (Japan) have found that two daily doses of curcumin (the active component in turmeric that gives it its characteristic yellow colour) can counteract the damage caused by prolonged exposure to UV light, improve the elasticity of skin and prevent the formation of wrinkles. Read More

  • Susana Andújar, chemist

    How Is the Efficacy of Cosmetics Measured?

    15 May How Is the Efficacy of Cosmetics Measured?

    Cosmetic products packaging and advertising can sometimes promise the moon. After watching certain TV commercials, you get the impression some creams will work wonders on your skin: wrinkles will disappear and the skin will become soft and silky, just like the model in the ad. But is it true? How do they check the real effects of cosmetics?


    Legislation on cosmetic products requires that proof be provided for each claim made. For this reason, before a new formula is launched on the market, the manufacturing company's R&D department performs different tests, depending on the product properties they want to focus on. The "claims" that appear on the label and in ads must be backed by scientific studies. These tests are done in vitro (in an artificial or natural laboratory environment), in vivo (on people, never on animals) or using both methods. Finally, the results are always checked by applying the product on volunteers. Read More