• Anna Solana, science journalist

    BB, CC, DD, EE creams…

    20 Dec BB, CC, DD, EE creams...

     

    Sources:

    The Guardian

    The Huffington Post

    These pairs of letters are not codenames for operating systems, usually identified with letters of the alphabet. They rather describe multifunction or all-in-one creams that, for years, have promised countless benefits for the skin. But what are the differences between the BB, CC, DD and EE versions? Do they actually work or are they merely effective marketing strategies?

     

    BB creams have been on the Western market for some five years, although the name has existed for far longer. In fact, the German dermatologist and allergist Christine Schrammek claims to have developed the first Blemish Balm (BB) cream in 1967 to treat the skin after peeling treatments. The original formula contained zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, licorice root and panthenol — an anti-inflammatory, protective, soothing and moisturizing cocktail that gave the product considerable appeal. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Confirmed: sunscreen prevents wrinkles

    20 Dec Confirmed: sunscreen prevents wrinkles

     

    Sources:

    Annals of Internal Medicine

    Just over a year ago we published scientific evidence on the effectiveness of sunscreens against wrinkles. Since then the cosmetics sector has included sunscreen in many products, like make-up, with good results. The message is clear: sunscreen is crucial. Always.

     

    In June 2013, the Annals of Internal Medicine published the results of a major study, conducted in Australia over four years, which underlined that wearing sunscreen daily helps prevent wrinkles. In fact, the study, a milestone for professionals in terms of duration and scope, underlined that a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 is more effective than taking nutritional supplements, such as beta-carotene, to preserve the skin. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Sunburns triple the risk of skin cancer

    21 Nov

     

    Sunburn is dangerous. It may increase the risk of skin cancer, even though we may have been burned – as children – before we were aware of the consequences. We have been warned time and again, but we still see skins red as tomatoes from the sun.

     

    That’s why some organizations continue to emphasize informing the consumer. This Cancer Research (UK) video explains what happens to cells when the sun damages them and the difference with other burns caused by hot objects. The other burns heal, but burns from the sun can have dramatic consequences many years later. Contact burns merely destroy some skin cells, nothing more. Sunburn also destroys cells, but it also alters the DNA of surviving cells and this can lead to the development of cancer. A simple but enlightening reason not to forget to protect yourself from the sun. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Sunscreens are not enough to avoid cancer

    15 Oct Sunscreens are not enough to avoid cancer

     

    Sources:

    Nature

    A few years ago the European Union banned use of the term total block" in sunscreen labels because it led to confusion. There is, in fact, no photoprotection that is 100% effective against UV radiation. A study published recently in Nature confirms that sunscreens do not protect fully against melanoma but this does not mean we should stop using them.

     

    The research – conducted by scientists from the Institute of Cancer Research in London and Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute – demonstrates that even a sun protection factor (SPF) of 50 allows some DNA-damaging radiation to penetrate the skin, possibly causing melanoma. This, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, affects every year about 160,000 people worldwide, according to WHO, with the number of cases in Spain increasing by 38% in the last four years. Read More

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