• Anna Solana, science journalist

    Photoprotective pills

    14 Oct  Photoprotective pills

     

    Sources:

    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas

    Applying sunscreen is the most common way to protect the skin from the sun’s radiation, but not everyone uses the most suitable product and not everyone remembers to re-apply it after a few hours. For some time now, more convenient alternatives for avoiding UV damage have been investigated. Oral photoprotectors could be one solution.

     

    These products are sold as a method to protect the skin of the entire body evenly and uniformly, with no need to worry about sweat or contact with clothes or water, as happens with sunscreens. Oral sunscreens essentially contain antioxidants (carotenoids, polyphenols, flavonoids, etc.) and vitamins (C, E) that restore damage to DNA caused by UV rays. So far, however, they have not been shown to provide sufficient protection to be able to replace sun creams and, even less, to replace coverup clothing, sunhats and sunglasses. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Sun damage continues after dark

    31 May Sun damage continues after dark

     

    Sources:

    Scientific American

    It may take a few hours for you to realise that you got sunburned while sunbathing. Similarly, the mutations that ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause in DNA and that lead to the dreaded skin cancer continue for several hours after you’ve left the beach or the mountains and the sun has gone down.

     

    Researchers at Yale University – led by Douglas E. Brash, a professor of radiology and dermatology – have published a study in Science that demonstrates that melanin, the pigment that darkens the skin to protect it from harm inflicted by UV rays, also has its downside. Certain components of this pigment are involved in the onset of DNA lesions that can cause the mutations responsible for melanoma – which continue for up to four hours after sun exposure has ended. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Aircraft cabins and UVA rays

    25 Feb Aircraft cabins and UVA rays

     

    Sources:

    JAMA Dermatology

    UVB rays are partially filtered by glass in windows and windscreens, but not UVA rays — and likewise with the glass in airplanes. Except that the altitude at which most commercial aircraft fly (30,000 feet) aggravates this problem further. Cabin crew, most especially pilots, are therefore at a high risk of developing skin cancer.

     

    Martina Sanlorenzo, a researcher at the University of California, recently authored a study that compared radiation in aircraft cabins with that in tanning beds. She found that about 55 minutes flying at over 30,000 feet was equivalent to 20 minutes in a tanning bed. Contrasting her data with other studies, Sanlorenzo and her team calculated that pilots and cabin crew were up to 2.22 times more likely to develop skin cancer. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Confirmed: sunscreen prevents wrinkles

    20 Dec Confirmed: sunscreen prevents wrinkles

     

    Sources:

    Annals of Internal Medicine

    Just over a year ago we published scientific evidence on the effectiveness of sunscreens against wrinkles. Since then the cosmetics sector has included sunscreen in many products, like make-up, with good results. The message is clear: sunscreen is crucial. Always.

     

    In June 2013, the Annals of Internal Medicine published the results of a major study, conducted in Australia over four years, which underlined that wearing sunscreen daily helps prevent wrinkles. In fact, the study, a milestone for professionals in terms of duration and scope, underlined that a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 is more effective than taking nutritional supplements, such as beta-carotene, to preserve the skin. Read More

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