• Elisabet Salmerón, science journalist

    How does my work affect my skin?

    Your work may represent a hazard for your skin. Contact with harmful substances and agents, the lack of humidity in enclosed spaces and high levels of stress may causes skin problems and disorders. What can be done to prevent this damage and keep the skin healthy?


    It is popularly said that work is health. But sometimes work has a pernicious impact on the body, especially the skin. According to reliable reports for Spain, for instance, skin disorders are second in the ranking of occupational diseases. The same is true for many other countries. Some skin problems cause chronic lesions that may incapacitate a person for life or oblige them to change jobs, yet these data receive little publicity. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    The wrinkle filler crisis

    24 Mar The wrinkle filler crisis



    BBC News Health

    Rejuvenating skin treatments in the form of injections of various kinds have averted the need for cosmetic surgery for many women (and men). But side effects have proliferated, because the products are not always of high quality and the people who administer them do not necessarily have suitable qualifications.


    Would you get a botox or collagen injection at a hairdressing salon or a beauty party? Well, it happens a lot and, in view of the complications, has raised the alarm among doctors. The UK Royal College of Surgeons, for instance, has launched an initiative to ensure that only doctors, qualified nurses and dentists can inject botox, which is actually a powerful neurotoxin. In addition, charlatans offer misleadingly cheap offers and inject diluted hyaluronic acid – and logically the effect lasts half as long. In the USA, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has only approved five substances, along with botox, as wrinkle fillers, and all are considered medicines. In Europe, however, almost 50 substances are allowed. If you are thinking about removing years from your face using collagen, hyaluronic acid or botox injections, consult a specialist medical centre. Do not put your skin or body at risk.

  • Núria Estapé, science journalist

    Enzymes for skin care

    21 Mar Enzymes for skin care



    The New York Times

    Enzymology is a new research area in dermatology and cosmetics that tries to discover how enzymes can improve skin appearance and prevent skin problems. Pharmaceutical companies study enzymes associated with skin disorders, whereas the cosmetics sector is interested in enzymes that enhance the beauty of the skin. However, including suitable enzymes in the diet is currently the most natural and effective way to achieve a healthy and beautiful skin.


    To remain healthy and vibrant the skin needs to be nourished with fats, proteins and carbohydrates. For these substances to act optimally on skin tissues, they need certain small molecules, called enzymes, to accelerate chemical reactions. Enzymes help food pass from the blood to the skin, develop beneficial fats and repair collagen damaged by ultraviolet rays, just to name a few of their many functions. There are many kinds of enzymes. Those most frequently used in cosmetics, called proteolytic enzymes, break down proteins so that the skin can better absorb their components and so promote cell growth and renewal. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Fatal attraction: is it chemistry?

    16 Mar Fatal attraction: is it chemistry?




    "We met and immediately there was ‘chemistry’ between us, bubbling just below the surface of our skin ...”. This is the typical explanation for a sudden attraction between two people. If we are lucky we have had the experience. Is it possible that our skin or chemistry can lead us straight to passion? Let’s see if there is any scientific explanation for love at first sight ...


    We take it for granted that humans are more rational and sophisticated than other beings, thanks to the rapid development of the human brain. Whereas animals, less advanced, relate exclusively according to basic primary and irrational mechanisms. This is not entirely true, however, as we unconsciously react to many chemical stimuli secreted by others. The pheromones we emit (but which we do not smell) trigger responses in others. For example, androsterone, a male pheromone secreted primarily through the skin, is perceived (unconsciously) by females and can trigger an immediate physical response. Read More