• Fede Montagud, editor

    Biological deodorants?

    6 Jun Biological deodorants?

     

    Sources:

    Science Daily

    Deodorants and antiperspirants may reduce or hide the smell emanating from the armpits after a hard day's work or a workout, but no product can completely eliminate body odour. However, a recent discovery could help improve the products currently available in the market.

     

    A few years ago, Chris Callewaert, a researcher at the University of Ghent (Belgium), suggested that, since body odour is not always a matter of hygiene, it had to stop being a taboo subject. There are more bacteria in our armpits, remember, than there are humans on the planet. And some people simply accumulate more of the microorganisms responsible for the decomposition of sweat molecules, and so they smell worse. Callewaert referred mainly to bacteria from the genus Corynebacterium, at that time considered to be primarily responsible for body odour. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Cosmetic surgery: think twice…

    21 May Cosmetic surgery: think twice...

     

    Sources:

    The Guardian

    Cosmetic or plastic surgery is no trivial matter. And not just because a person may become unrecognizable or lose something of their character, as has recently happened with celebrities. Misinformation and the tendency to make light of cosmetic surgery lead us to overlook the fact that it is still surgery, with all the associated risks. An Australian initiative recommends a mandatory cooling-off period of at least a week.

     

    The Medical Board of Australia, which regulates medical practice in this country, wishes to remedy the current situation with its publication of a guide that recommends a cooling-off period before any operation. The aim is for the patient to consider all aspects of their decision to undergo a surgical procedure for purely cosmetic reasons. Caution is crucial, especially in light of complaints and cases of malpractice by unqualified personnel operating in ill-equipped clinics. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Emojis also reflect phototypes

    27 Apr Emojis also reflect phototypes

     

    Sources:

    NPR News

    Emojis are the faces that are used to express emotions in online communications. Anyone who uses a mobile phone, instant messaging or social networks will have seen lots of them. In the latest version of its operating system, Apple has introduced new emojis with different skin tones, resulting is some controversy in the WWW.

     

    Some forums refer to racism, because, it is claimed, the yellow faces are too yellow. Online, the least little outburst can set the WWW afire. The question is why has Apple classified humans in terms of six skin tones: why not four or 10? Is this a whim of Apple designers? No, in fact. Apple designers have done their homework and the decision is scientifically grounded. The new Apple emojis, which users worldwide are already downloading, are based on the phototype classification created in 1975 by Thomas B. Fitzpatrick and widely used today. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    A sensor patch to analyse sweat

    17 Apr A sensor patch to analyse sweat

     

    Sources:

    IEEE Spectrum

    They say bracelets and watches are taking on a new meaning – as “wearables”, whether they count the steps we take during the day or monitor the quality of our sleep. Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (USA) have developed a bandaid-like wearable gadget with a sensor that measures electrolytes, metabolites and proteins in perspiration and which could prove to be of diagnostic value.

     

    Using perspiration to diagnose certain diseases is nothing new; cystic fibrosis can be ruled out by this method, for intance, and perspiration has also been used to determine drug intake. But the Novel Devices Laboratory at the University of Cincinnati (USA) has gone a step further: Jason Heickenfel and his team have developed a wearable gadget consisting of material that absorbs perspiration, a circuit that calculates perspiration levels of certain ions, e.g., sodium, and a unit for radio frequency transmission of this data to a smartphone. Read More

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