• Núria Estapé, science journalist

    Caffeine for the skin

    The beauty industry has appropriated the active ingredient of our most universal breakfast drink. Caffeine, the alkaloid that wakes us up by stimulating the nervous system, also has beneficial properties for the skin. It appears that it reduces cellulite, increases blood circulation in the small blood vessels that nourish the skin, prevents skin cancers and even promotes hair growth in men.

     

    Caffeine is being included in formulas for body creams, hair lotions and other cosmetic preparations. Most of these products contain just 3% of this substance. Its chemical characteristics (it dissolves in water but not in oil) make its application in cosmetics difficult, because, in its free form, it penetrates poorly to the interior of the epidermis. But thanks to modern emulsions and microspheres for delivering substances and facilitating penetration, caffeine is now used as a key skincare ingredient. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Glycans: is this the sugar the skin needs?

    28 Feb Glycans: is this the sugar the skin needs?

     

    Sources:

    American Academy of Dermatology

    These complex carbohydrates are not related to the sugars we ingest through food. Glycans, found on the cell surface, play an important role in intercellular communication, metabolism and skin structuring. Maybe that's why they have become the new promise of youth in the world of cosmetics.

     

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) noted the importance of glycans in an article titled “Glycomics”, published in 2001, but for over a decade scientific advances in this field were timid. However, for some years now, the cosmetics industry has been flirting with the benefits of this line of research for improving the appearance of the skin. In fact, some brands already have creams in the market whose labels include the term "glycans", conjugated with the term "eternal youth". Read More

  • Ailish Maher, science journalist

    Laser treatments for ageing or damaged skin

    21 Jan Laser treatments for ageing or damaged skin

     

    Sources:

    Mayo Clinic

    Mail Online

    You have probably heard of the wonders of laser skin treatments and so may be asking if laser could help overcome some of the effects of ageing that start to become increasingly visible as you grow older. Be guided by a reputable dermatologist who will advise you regarding the treatment best suited for your skin type and condition — and also for your pocket.

     

    Laser advances are most especially being made at the cosmetic end of the spectrum, which means they are less invasive than traditional treatments like chemicals peels and dermabrasion. However, if you are considering some kind of laser or light-based treatment for your skin, it is extremely important that you consult a dermatologist or specialist centre. Be sure to ask about side effects, recovery times, number and frequency of treatments, any pre- and post-treatment skincare requirements. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Confirmed: sunscreen prevents wrinkles

    20 Dec Confirmed: sunscreen prevents wrinkles

     

    Sources:

    Annals of Internal Medicine

    Just over a year ago we published scientific evidence on the effectiveness of sunscreens against wrinkles. Since then the cosmetics sector has included sunscreen in many products, like make-up, with good results. The message is clear: sunscreen is crucial. Always.

     

    In June 2013, the Annals of Internal Medicine published the results of a major study, conducted in Australia over four years, which underlined that wearing sunscreen daily helps prevent wrinkles. In fact, the study, a milestone for professionals in terms of duration and scope, underlined that a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 is more effective than taking nutritional supplements, such as beta-carotene, to preserve the skin. Read More

Authors

+more
­