• Anna Solana, science journalist

    Can stretch marks be removed?

    31 Jul Can stretch marks be removed?

     

    Sources:

    EFE Salud

    The term “stria” refers to a line, groove or ridge in a surface. Striae now refer to the marks that appear in the skin when it stretches and tears. Appearing in adolescence, as a consequence of pregnancy and when weight is gained or lost, they are difficult to hide. All kinds of creams and other more drastic solutions to combat them are offered in the market. But is it really possible to remove them?

     

    When stretch marks first appear, they are reddish or violet coloured but they eventually become whiteish to the point where they seem to be simple scratches. Their name directly reflects their origin in an overstretching of the dermis due to changes in the body. However, they are caused in different ways. In the early twentieth century they were attributed to infections such as tuberculosis or typhoid. Later they were also associated with malnutrition and toxic states. Most contemporary theories link them to hormones, specifically glucocorticoids (cortisol, basically), which affect the formation of collagen and elastin, both necessary to keep the skin elastic. Some experts, in the absence of other evidence, blame the genes. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Exercising rejuvenates the skin

    26 Jul Exercising rejuvenates the skin

     

    Sources:

    The New York Times

    Exercising is less expensive than wrinkle creams and is, judging by a recent study from McMaster University in Ontario (Canada), more effective. Exercising improves the appearance of the skin and slows down the signs of ageing, even in those who take it up late on in life.

     

    According to researchers at McMaster University, after the age of 40, men and women who do at least three hours per week of sport have smoother, healthier skin and a thicker dermis than the average for their age cohort. In other words, their skin resembles that of people aged 20 to 30 years old. Although it is still unclear what changes exercising brings about in the composition of the skin, these scientists think the anti-wrinkle effect may be due to the paracrine action of the muscle-produced myokine hormone, which induces changes in specific receptors in neighbouring cells. Read More

  • Elisabet Salmerón, science journalist

    Which cellulite and how to treat it

    20 Jul Which cellulite and how to treat it

     

    Sources:

    AEDV

    Cellulite is an aesthetic problem of the skin that affects most women. Insistent advertising tries to take advantage of the complex women have about “orange-peel skin”, promising almost miraculous outcomes but often failing to deliver. But don’t be discouraged. While there is no 100% solution for eliminating cellulite, good diagnosis and proper selection and application of treatments can help reduce cellulite and improve your health.

     

    Nine out of ten women say they are concerned about cellulite, which is an abnormal fat accumulation that occurs in certain areas of the body (especially the thighs, hips, buttocks and stomach). However, over 30% admitted not doing everything they could to combat it. In most cases this lack of prevention is due to the belief that treatment requires great dedication. But this is not the case. Small daily actions, such as drinking plenty of water and avoiding tight clothing, are a good starting point to combat cellulite. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Careful with henna tattoos!

    15 Jul Careful with henna tattoos!

     

    Sources:

    AEDV

    Getting a henna tattoo is an engaging experience for adults and children in the summer. After all, it is just for a few days. But you may end up regretting it. Tattoos made with black henna, whose decorative motifs may even include glitter, can trigger severe allergic skin reactions and permanent sensitization.

     

    Henna is traditionally used in North Africa and other parts of Asia as a hair dye and in religious and ritual tattoos. This natural henna is dark green to brown in colour and lasts three or four days at most. But black henna can draw on the skin in a way more like the ink used in permanent tattoos because, as the name suggests, it is darker in colour. Its success on beaches, especially among children, is explained by the fact that it lasts longer and is easier to apply. To achieve this effect, various colours are added to the natural henna – which is where the problem lies, as they include paraphenylenediamine (PPD). Read More

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